Catch-And-Release_Is It Really Humane?

I was reading an article today on Google+ about the merits of catch-and-release when it comes to fishing for endangered species. The fish in particular that the article was focused on, was the White River Sturgeon, a beautiful animal by any standard (other than facial features), and a constant reminder that we share this world with many creatures that have been around a whole lot longer than we have.

Photo Credit: http://thelife-animal.blogspot.ca/2012/11/lake-sturgeon.html
Photo Credit: http://thelife-animal.blogspot.ca/2012/11/lake-sturgeon.html

Now the above photo is actually a Lake Sturgeon (close enough for the point of my post), and in case you didn’t notice in the credit beneath the photo, the picture is not my own (I’ll include a couple fish pictures of my own later, but of a totally different species). If you do follow that link, however, it makes for some great reading.

What I did want to talk about in this post is a possible problem that you seldom see mentioned in articles of this nature, but for which I have seen at least some evidence. It involves taking a fish from muddy waters (such as found in many river systems) out into the bright afternoon sun, so that even if you catch-and-release, you might inadvertently be putting a blind (and thus helpless) fish back into the water.

When I lived in Northern Saskatchewan while I attended university in Saskatoon, I used to fish the North Saskatchewan River on week-ends with a couple friends, and we always fished around midnight by the light of the moon. We did this mainly because the river there is known for its Giant Yellow Pickerel. Whereas you could catch 2 and 3-pound eating size fish all afternoon long in that  stretch of water, it was only once it was completely black, with just the moon for light, that the big ones came out hunting.

And that’s my point. If those fish’s eyes were so sensitive that they could find my minnows in that muddy river water, at midnight, by the light of a prairie moon, (and with that mucky water it’s easily as dark in that water all day) just imagine being suddenly yanked out of that darkness into the blazing afternoon sun.  After I read about this blindness issue on a number of occasions, and then talked to some of the older Native guys in the area, I came to a place of understanding where I decided that if I caught a fish, unless it was completely against the law to do so, I might just as well eat it, as put it back in the water where it was probably so helpless now, it was just going to get eaten, or starve to death (for lack of being able to hunt) anyway.

Now I’m not saying that everyone has to believe the same things I believe, and I also think the whole thing varies with the species of fish, and the type of water the fish dwells in. Here in BC where I’ve lived for the last 36 years or so, in our mountain lakes the water is so clear, you can see all the way to the bottom anyway, and the Trout streams are pretty much the same deal. I imagine fish in that kind of setting require different visual equipment then fish that live in water that is so mucky,  that you can barely see a foot in front of your face. But anyway, with all the talk about catch-and-release, I just thought I’d throw that out there.

And now as promised, a couple of my own fish-pics.

Orange Koi At Chinese Gardens
Orange Koi At Chinese Gardens
Speckled Koi At Chinese Gardens
Speckled Koi At Chinese Gardens
Speckled Koi At Chinese Gardens 2
Speckled Koi At Chinese Gardens 2

And finally, just a quick peek at the Chinese Gardens that contains the pond which is home to the above-pictured koi (but certainly not the lake sturgeon). Other than that, have a great week people, be happy, and stay safe.

Just one of the trails that helps transport visitors away from the hustle-bustle of Downtown Vancouver.
Just one of the trails that helps transport visitors away from the hustle-bustle of Downtown Vancouver.

Catch-And-Release_Is It Really Humane?

A Glance At The Park

Just thought I would sneak in a quick picture of this view I saw the other day, of Stanley Park beckoning to me from across the Bay. From where I took the picture, to the Park is roughly a 40-minute walk, and it’s one that I take quite often as I look for new things to snap pictures of while I work the aches and pains out of these creaky joints (they’re not really that creaky). Anyway, the bridge in the picture is called The Lions Gate, which is where the movie company that films so many of their movies here in Vancouver got their name from, and the people in those cars crossing that bridge are on their way to North Vancouver, or maybe West Vancouver or parts beyond. The North Shore Mountains make up the back-drop. As  you can see, our weather has been holding, and I hope yours has also. Everyone take care now, stay safe, and we’ll see you next time.

Stanley Park Across The Inlet
Stanley Park Across The Inlet

Image

That’s More Like It

The first  thing I thought when I saw this scene as I was out walking today was, “Now that looks a little more like summer!” So never being too far from my trusty Nikon, I snapped it, and here it is just so no one can deny that we actually had a summer this year, no matter how short it may have been.

Now That's Looking A Little More Like Summer
Now That’s Looking A Little More Like Summer

Image

A Teeny Glimpse Inside The Blogger

A Reflection of My Life
A Reflection of My Life
And Those With Whom I Choose To Share
And Those With Whom I Choose To Share
Because Where Some See Weeds...I Only See Character
Because Where Some See Weeds…I Only See Character
And Individuality
And Individuality
And Ray Conniff___Sorry-Different Story
And Ray Conniff___Sorry-Different Story

Gallery

Changes Soon To Come

So I managed to get out yesterday and today, and even set my camera to a couple hard days work. Though I obviously haven’t had time to work on the results yet (a total of roughly 850 shots), I thought I would let you see the very first one that I just finished a few minutes ago. I thought it worked out alright as far as samples go, and hopefully in the next few days I’ll be able to put a gallery together that will be worth waiting for. In the meantime, I hope everyone is enjoying their summer, and for my American friends in particular, I hope these election shenanigans are at least working out as well as you could possibly hope for. Everyone take care, and remember the sunscreen.

Bleeding Hearts With Minor Mods 001
Bleeding Hearts With Minor Mods 001

Image

Hello From Vancouver, Canada

I was planning on changing the posting on my site today, but got myself into a rush and discovered I didn’t have a whole lot of time left to do much of anything. So instead of a detailed gallery, I decided to give you all a quick look at what my favorite country looks like from Outer Space, when you take into account all the different soil temperatures, textures, moisture levels and such. All these things were figured out by the RADARSAT-2 Data satellite that actually took the 121 pictures that were required to produce this one final shot. So here it is, the country where I live, and if you find the little arrow down around the bottom left-hand corner, you might be able to spot me waving up at you as I rush out my door. If not, catch you next time.

A mosaic of Canada as seen from space.
A mosaic of Canada as seen from space.

Image

A Reminder of Days Gone By

So here we are, July 5th, and the weather here in Vancouver is once again back to the rain and cool temperatures. So since I haven’t been getting out a whole lot with the camera this year, and since I just paid my yearly fees, which means my third year of Vancouver Visions is just about to begin (in September to be precise), I thought I would take a look back at some of the earlier pictures that have graced these pages, and at the same time, I might convince myself that we really do get nice weather here at least once in a while. So if some of the following shots look familiar, it’s because they’ve all appeared here at least once before. Oooh, Spooky!

 Some roses in Ava's garden, 2014.
Some roses in Ava’s garden, 2014.
Another cluster of flowers from Ava's garden, 2014.
Another cluster of flowers from Ava’s garden, 2014.
Church steeple at night.
A solitary streetlight adds a highlight to the silhouette of the church steeple in the early evening hours.
The Gumhead Sculpture
This is a self-portrait sculpture by Douglas Coupland called “Gumhead”. It is constructed from steel, milled foam, resin, and yep, you guessed it, gum. And just in case you’re not sure what kind of gum I’m talking about, Mr. Coupland has also invited all passers-by and viewers, to add their own chewing gum to his sculpture, thus obliterating his original work, and creating something new in the process. The sign in front of the statue suggests you wash your hands after adding your chewing gum to the work in progress. I second the motion.
Just one of many fractal designs I came up with when I took an interest in Fractal Art several years ago.
Just one of many fractal designs I came up with when I took an interest in Fractal Art several years ago.
Night falls on the city streets.
Night falls on the city streets.
Peaceful grays and gentle blues.
Peaceful grays and gentle blues.

Gallery